Final Webinar in the Quality Management Series, Auditing

Posted in :: 2020 Volume 1 :: Monday, January 27th, 2020

February 5, 2020
3:00 pm ET, 20:00 GMT

Join FACT for the final webinar in the ninth Quality Management Series, Auditing.  Phillip Johnson, MMedSc(Path), Production Manager at Queensland Cord Blood Bank at the Mater, Sylvia Dulan, RN, MSN, MBA, PMP, HCT Regulatory and Quality Management Specialist at City of Hope Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Program, and Ann Wilson, MHA, MT(ASCP)SB , Lab and Quality Manager at Scott & White Autologous Transplant Program, will give an overview of their program’s audit process and how they write audit reports.

Register now

The first three webinars within the module are available for download in the FACT store:

  1. QM Series 9: Auditing: Planning and Executing
  2. QM Series 9: Auditing: Summarizing and Evaluating the Data
  3. QM Series 9: Auditing: Performing follow-up to assess the effectiveness of the actions implemented on correcting the errors

Stay tuned for the next QM Series 10, Validations!  Topics include Validation Overview, Process Validation, Software Validation, and Program Perspectives on Validation.


Data Management Resources Serve as Gateway to Improving Reporting

Posted in :: 2018 Volume 3 :: Tuesday, August 21st, 2018

By Heather Conway, FACT Quality Manager

To assess compliance with FACT standard B9, the FACT-CIBMTR Data Audit Committee reviews each program’s most recent CIBMTR data audit results including implementation, adequacy, and effectiveness of the corrective action plan (CAP). The committee’s goal is to provide education and assistance to cellular therapy programs throughout the accreditation cycle to achieve quality improvement in data management. At the time of accreditation renewal, the FACT Accreditation Committee assesses the completeness and accuracy of a program’s data management based on the clinical inspector’s report and the report of the FACT-CIBMTR Data Audit Committee.

Since its inception, the committee has provided extensive guidance and assistance to programs regarding data management, audit, and quality improvement principles. Using this experience, the committee created a Data Management resources area to assist programs. Programs are encouraged to review this information, which contains CIBMTR resources, FACT educational resources, guidelines for data management submissions, templates, and examples.

The FACT-CIBMTR collaborative data audit process was formed to reduce duplicative efforts, enhance quality improvement efforts, and provide support to accredited transplant programs. The program intensifies support and improvement of data management and reporting processes, and these new resources support these efforts. In addition to the website, view previous newsletter articles about the program:

FACT and CIBMTR Announce Joint Data Audit Program

The Role of Medical Records During On-Site Clinical Program Inspections


ISBT 128 Audit Tool for Cellular Therapy Provides Additional Resource for Verifying Labels

Posted in :: 2018 Volume 2 :: Tuesday, May 22nd, 2018

It has been a long time coming, but now it is official. Full implementation of ISBT 128 coding and labeling is required of cellular therapy programs.

ICCBBA released an ISBT 128 compliance audit tool for use with cellular therapy products. The tool provides a means of determining compliance with the ISBT 128 Standard, and can be used by any cellular therapy facility around the world. It includes both interactive and printable audit checklists. FACT recommends use of this tool to verify correct implementation of ISBT 128 and to verify ongoing compliance. It may also be useful as an educational reference.

It is important to note that the tool does not take into consideration requirements from national regulatory bodies and may not cover all labeling requirements of cellular therapy accreditation bodies. Additionally, the tool does not ensure that proper Product Codes have been selected. Rather, it verifies correct placement and format of complete information.

Although ICCBBA has made validation tools available in the past, this is the first time an audit tool has been released. Input was received from industry experts and the international Cellular Therapy Coding and Labeling Advisory Group that is co-sponsored by ICCBBA, AABB, FACT, ISCT, and others. An instructional video is available on the ICCBBA website at www.iccbba.org.


Establishing Efficiencies Between IND Requirements and FACT Standards

Posted in :: 2017 Volume 2 :: Thursday, October 26th, 2017

Many FACT-accredited cellular therapy programs participate in clinical trials, and awareness of such activities has become more pronounced with the advent of FACT’s new voluntary accreditation for immune effector cellular (IEC) therapy. Most IEC products are administered under Investigational New Drug, or IND, requirements.

There are some FACT requirements that are not typically required of INDs but could greatly enhance research, such as a quality management program, accessible procedures, and training.  Likewise, some typical IND requirements could be used to also satisfy FACT requirements, and documentation created to comply with IND requirements can be used.

Outcomes

FACT requires outcome analysis, which is also performed in accordance with IND requirements. The program does not need to gather and report its own independent data if this is already performed by the investigator and shared with the program.  This could be demonstrated through minutes from a quality meeting where outcomes were reviewed, or within signed outcome analysis reports. The key is that outcome information is reported back to the accredited center’s Quality Management (QM) program in some fashion to allow assessment of program performance (such as personnel training and competency or needed procedural improvements).

Product efficacy based on patient outcome may be difficult to document for novel cellular therapy products, and that assessment will differ for each product type. Predefined outcome criteria for investigational cellular therapy products (e.g., CAR T-cells, vaccines) may be found in the clinical research protocol and may include clinical outcomes or only safety endpoints, depending on the trial phase. Data from each investigational product does not need to be aggregated in total; for example, IECs vary widely in cell type, manipulation, protocol, and indication. However, data regarding similar products may shed important light on process improvements within the control and discretion of the program (protocols must be strictly followed per IND requirements).

Reporting of outcome data also advances the field. FACT Standards recommend that Clinical Programs collect each of the data elements contained in the applicable CIBMTR Cellular Therapy forms or EBMT forms. Use of the actual form and submission to CIBMTR or EBMT is not required unless dictated by applicable laws and regulations. FACT strongly recommends the publication of data and strongly encourages the submission of data to the CIBMTR. In the event that the Clinical Program does not submit data to these registries, it should provide reasonable explanations for not doing so. Examples of the forms currently utilized by the CIBMTR may be found on the organization’s website at http://www.cibmtr.org.

Audits

Similar to outcome analysis, audits are typically performed as directed by INDs and the results of those audits can satisfy FACT Standards if they are forwarded to the QM Program for review. If an IND does not require an audit, then an audit as required by the Standards must take place.

Policies and Procedures

Many programs utilize IND protocols to satisfy FACT requirements for SOPs.  At a minimum, programs should have a local, high-level SOP that describes the big picture of the activities to perform. Actual protocols could be referenced and made available to staff, or the detailed procedural steps could be outlined in job-specific SOPs. Some manufacturers have very specific SOPs and provide them to programs, and, in these cases, there is no need to copy the SOP over to the program’s format. However, protocols are not a no-fail way of meeting the intent of the standard.  Programs should ensure that the protocols include specific details for staff performance without being burdensomely long, that they are accessible to staff, and that training on the protocols has been performed.